Modern military analysis and history book – “Civil-Military Relations in Southeast Asia” (Cambridge University Press, 2018) – Aurel Croissant interview – MHIO Episode 50

Dr. Aurel Croissant is Professor of Political Science at the Institute of Political Science, Ruprecht-Karls-University, Heidelberg. His main research interests include the comparative analysis of political structures and processes in East- and Southeast Asia, the theoretical and empirical analysis of democracy, civil-military relations, terrorism and political violence. We discussed his latest book on civil-military relations in Southeast Asia.

0:55 – Aurel talks about how he got into studying Southeast Asian military affairs.

1:45 – Aurel talks about the countries that he focuses on in the book.

3:59 – Aurel talks about how these various countries developed their military institutions. Both the western model and the Soviet model have had an affect on these countries.

9:28 – Aurel talks about the military startegies of these countries.

10:21 – Aurel talks about these militaries roles in their respective societies.

13:53 – Aurel talks about which servies dominate the various militaries.

15:18 – Aurel talks about how he did the research for the book.

19:27 – Aurel talks about the influence that elites have in civil-military continuity.

27:34 – Aurel can be found on the Heidelberg University website.

Links of interest

https://www.uni-heidelberg.de/politikwissenschaften/personal/croissant/croissant_en.html

https://www.cambridge.org/core/elements/civilmilitary-relations-in-southeast-asia/6E22E7C9244503D345920BF7F44347A2

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Aurel Croissant

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, Southeast Asia, independence, colonialism, Malaysia, Singapore, Vietnam, Indonesia

American Revolution history book – “Valley Forge” (Simon & Schuster, 2018) – Tom Clavin interview – MHIO Episode 46

Tom Clavin is a prolific history writer who’s been on the New York Times Bestsllers list. We talk about his latest book co-authored with Bob Drury, Valley Forge.

0:41 – Tom talks about how he got into co-authoring a book on Valley Forge during the American Revolution.

3:05 – Tom talks about how the book is laid out and describes each of the three parts.

7:51 – Tom talks about the ways Washington was able to keep his troops at Valley Forge.

10:44 – Tom talks about Lafayette and Von Steuben.

14:14 – Tom talks about Washington’s feelings of fatherliness to the men in his army and to the country.

17:02 – Tom talks about the British plans and the effects of winter on campaigning.

19:58 – Tom talks about Washington’s plans for the time at Valley Forge and after. He also describes Von Steuben and what he did for the army.

24:19 – Tom talks about how Washignton managed an army made up of people from all over the country and also of other nationalities. There were also hundreds of black troops in the army.

29:00 – Tom talks about what they used to research the book.

31:55 – Tom talks about visiting the site of Valley Forge.

34:55 – Tom tells the sad story of John Lawrence, one of Washington’s favorites.

38:15 – The Americans deployed an attack submarine during Valley Forge. As wild as that sounds, Tom explains.

39:40 – Tom talks about the effort to usurp Washington.

43:54 – Tom talks about how camp followers were taken care of.

45:29 – Tom talks about the huge population of people at Valley Forge at the time.

47:04 – Tom talks about Washington’s experience in managing this large number of people.

53:45 – He has a website tomclavin.com

Links of interest

http://www.simonandschuster.com/books/Valley-Forge/Bob-Drury/9781501152719

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Tom Clavin

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book. George Washington, Lafayette, Von Steuben, Alexander Hamilton, Howe, British, Continental Army, Continental Congress, Franklin, American Revolution

Apache Wars history book – “The Black Legend: George Bascom, Cochise, and the Start of the Apache Wars” (TwoDot, 2018) – Doug Hocking interview – MHIO Episode 41

Doug Hocking has lived in the American Southwest for much of his life. He’s written lots of western historical fiction and non-fiction. We discussed his latest book on Cochise and the Apache War of 1861.

0:50 – Doug talks about how he got into studying the Apache Wars. He grew up on the Jicarilla Apache reservation. He got into studying the Bascom and Cochise affair and found many discrepancies in the accepted story.

6:32 – Doug talks about how he starts the story in 1856. He then gets into how the Apache War started.

13:57 – Doug talks about the differences between US Army and Native American tactics.

He talks about terrain and weapons. He also talks about rations and food for each side.

19:00 – Doug talks about why he considers Cochise the best Apache leader in history.

22:32 – Doug talks about the relationships between the area tribes. He also talks about how the Apache Indians learned how to raid for spoils.

25:16 – Doug talks about how various groups in the area were armed.

29:08 – Doug talks about Apache clothing and how it was affected by combat. He also talks about clothing worn by US soldiers.

37:01 – Doug talks about the US Army were supplied in the area.

39:28 – Doug talks about who had to serve out in this area.

44:04 – Doug talks about what the forts were like in the area.

47:37 – Doug talks about the newspapers and other resources he used. He also mentions some Mexican records hat are useful to this research.

54:40 – Doug came to dislike Rueben Bernard.

58:07 – He’s on DougHocking.com and his books are there as well as on Amazon.

Links of interest

http://doughocking.com/

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Doug Hocking

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, California, Texas, US Civil War, Bascome, Cochise, Apaches, dragoons, Utes, Embudo mountains, Fort Union, Fort Buchanan, Santa fe, General Buell, West Point, Fort Massachusetts, Fort Defiance, Fort Cummings, Army posts, adobe, jachal, Tucson

WWI military history book – “Pershing’s Tankers” (The University Press of Kentucky, 2018) – Lawrence Kaplan interview – MHIO Episode 36

Lawrence Kaplan is a military historian who has worked for the US Army and has written numerous books on the subject. Today we spoke about his latest book on the American tank corps during WWI.

1:51 – Larry Kaplan talks about how he got into studying the American tank corps in WWI. He found a number of reports associated with the tank corps that hadn’t been discovered before or had been forgotten. Patton was one of the officers involved with the tank corps.

6:30 – Larry talks about the early development of the US Army tank corps. The French and the British helped the US in this effort. But not a lot was written about this history. Tanks were used for only 7 weeks at the end of the war.

11:20 – George Patton became the commander of the two tank battalions that were to be used in the war.

14:00 – Many of the records of these early tank battalions ended up missing. Larry found them among US Army Field Artillery records.

21:00 – Larry also collected newspaper accounts that were basically the letters home that some tank officers had sent home. He also made some extensive Congressional testimony on the WWI tank corps in WWI readable in a narrative form.

29:30 – Larry talks about what happened to the tank corps after WWI.

31:50 – Larry talks about a scandalous event that occurred during Patton’s time in WWI.

38:48 – The presence of American tanks helped US Army morale and hurt German morale.

39:39 – Larry summarizes how the end of the war went.

53:39 – Larry talks about how the tanks were moved around the theater of war. He also addresses problems with tank maintenance during combat. He gets into how an American officer named Brain was trying to develop requirements for an American-built tank.

58:30 – Larry will be publishing a translated and edited version of a Russian female soldier’s novel about serving in WWI.

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Lawrence Kaplan

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, world war one, WWI, tank corps, armored warfare, George Patton, French, british, Germans

18th and 19th C US Army history book – “The Soldiers of Fort Mackinac” (Michigan State University Press, 2018) – Phil Porter interview – MHIO Episode 30

Phil Porter is director of Mackinac State Historic Parks and has studied the Mackinac area extensively. We talk about his latest book on the soldiers of Fort Mackinac.

1:49 – Phil talks about how he got into Mackinac history 46 years ago. He’s written about US military authority after the American Revolution and he’s written another book on Fort Mackinac history.

5:27 – The book is a collection of images of soldiers who served at Fort Mackinac but also discusses the life of these soldiers and why they were at the Fort.

8:30 – Phil talks about some of the history of the British retaking of the fort in the War of 1812.

11:00 – Phil talks about the importance of the fort in the region.

18:05 – Phil talks about images of soldiers at the fort during the pre-War of 1812 period.

20:00 – We talk about uniform variations among soldiers at the Fort from the rest of the US Army.

23:31 – Phil talks about famed medical Dr. Beaumont who was a pioneer on digestive processes.

29:30 – Phil talks about relations between Native American and he soldiers of the fort over time.

31:07 – Phil talks about Civil War soldiers who had served at Fort Mackinac. One was Confederate officer John Pemberton.

36:00 – Phil talks about a soldier that served in the First Barbary War.

37:30 – Phil talks about three wealthy Confederates who were imprisoned at Fort Mackinac for a few months.

45:55 – Getting permissions to use images was a long and tedious process.

47:20 – They found a photo of soldiers playing baseball at the fort. They still play baseball at the fort at the same field.

54:43 – The parks’ books can be found on Amazon and on their website mackinacparks.com.

55:35 – Phil explains why the spelling is Mackinac but is pronounced Mackinaw.

Links of interest

Mackinac State Historic Parks

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Phil Porter

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, Revolutionary War, War of 1812, US Civil War, Mexican-American War, Native American, british, militia, First Barbary War, military prison, Michigan history

Vietnam War history book – “Uncommon Valor” (Naval Institute Press, 2018) – Stephen L. Moore interview – MHIO Episode 28

Stephen Moore is a marketing executive and journalist. He’s written numerous books and given lectures on Texas history and WWII. He’s written a new book on heroes of the Vietnam War and I spoke to him about this book.

1:34 – Stephen talks about how he got into this project through a family connection.

2:45 – Stephen talks about the book and how he interviewed the men the book is about. He attended their reunions to meet them. he interviewed Green Berets and also the pilots who flew them around in Vietnam.

4:51 – The book starts in Spring 1966 in Vietnam and goes into 1970. The area covers an area near Laos and Cambodia in North Vietnam.

8:40 – Stephen talks about their training and their rotations.

10:45 – Stephen talks about the Green Beret work with the Montagnards and how they earned their awards.

15:55 – Stephen also attended a 57th Helicopter Assault Company reunion too.

18:45 – Stephen talks about the helicopters would get the teams into the mission target area.

22:09 – Stephen talks about what information he gathered and used to do his research.

26:07 – Stephen talks how he reconciled differing stories.

28:46 – Stephen’s favorite part of the research was talking to the guys. He talks about prisoner snatch missions.

40:00 – Stephen was able to track down who was flying a plane that crashed during a Vietnam War mission. This information was unknown for 40 years.

42:50 – Stephen talks about some funny things that happened during the missions.

47:00 – Stephen talks about some of the stuff the Green Berets learned from the Montagnards.

53:10 – His website is StephenLMoore.com.

Links of interest

http://stephenlmoore.com/

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Stephen L. Moore

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, vietnam war, green berets, special forces, Navy SEALs, Helicopter assault, air force commandos, MACV-SOG, vietcong, medal of honor, purple heart, sacrifice, veterans, WWII