WWI history book – “Peace at Last” (Yale University Press, 2018) – Guy Cuthbertson interview – MHIO Episode 54


Dr. Guy Cuthbertson is an Associate Professor in English Literature and Head of the English Department at Liverpool Hope University. He’s studied at St Andrews University and at The Queen’s College, Oxford University.  We spoke about his latest book on the end of WWI.

0:57 – Guy talks about how he got into writing on study.  He started in English and moved into biography. 

2:05 – Guy talks about the book and WWI.

 6:28 – The book focuses on the human aspect of the last dayof WWI. Festivities and religion are two aspects he looks at.  He always tries to look at areas beyond London.

12:59 – Guy talks about the changes in society between the beginning and the end of the war.

 15:40 – Guy talks about the idea that the war broke down class distinctions and social mores.

 21:58 – Guy talks about the resources he used for his research.

26:21 – Guy talks about Gladstone’s library and other archives he went to.

54:44 – Guy has a website GuyCuthbertson.com

Links of interest


https://yalebooks.co.uk/display.asp?K=9780300233384

https://yalebooks.co.uk/display.asp?K=9780300233384

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Guy Cuthbertson

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict,war, interview, non-fiction book, WWI, world war one, faulkner, disney, fitzgerald, wilfred owen

WWI history book – “The Myriad Legacies of 1917 – A Year of War and Revolution” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) -Maartje Abbenhuis interview – MHIO Episode 49

Maartje Abbenhuis is a historian of of neutrality and internationalism, especially in regards to Europe from 1815 to 1919. She’s written numerous articles and books on the subject and teaches at the University of Auckland. We talk about her most recent work, a collection of essays on WWI in 1917 that she co-edited.

1:05 – Maartje talks about how she got into editing a book on WWI.

6:17 – We discuss the parallel between Lord of the Rings and WWI.

9:09 – Maartje talks about the essays in the book.

10:54 – Maartje talks about security and civil rights during WWI.

13:15 – Maartje talks about how the book reflects the New Zealand symposium that it was meant to accompany.

18:06 – Maartje talks about India’s involvement in WWI and also about Indian resistane to the British at this time.

25:12 – Maartje talks about New Zealand and WWI.

30:15 – Maartje talks about some of the research that went into the essays and what the collection goals were. She mentions that two of the essays were written by museum curators and directors.

33:18 – Maartje talks about German memories of WWI.

43:17 – Maartje talks about the global effects of WWI.

56:55 – Maartje talks about New Zealand and how its foundation myths connect to WWI.

1:00:26 – Maartje is on twitter @maartjeabb.

Links of interest

https://twitter.com/maartjeabb?lang=en

https://www.palgrave.com/us/book/9783319736846

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Maartje Abbenhuis

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, India, Britian, WWII, Germany, New Zealand, WWI, Empire, Ottoman, Maori, Australia, United States, California, latin America, globalization, industrial warfare

WWI military history book – “Pershing’s Tankers” (The University Press of Kentucky, 2018) – Lawrence Kaplan interview – MHIO Episode 36

Lawrence Kaplan is a military historian who has worked for the US Army and has written numerous books on the subject. Today we spoke about his latest book on the American tank corps during WWI.

1:51 – Larry Kaplan talks about how he got into studying the American tank corps in WWI. He found a number of reports associated with the tank corps that hadn’t been discovered before or had been forgotten. Patton was one of the officers involved with the tank corps.

6:30 – Larry talks about the early development of the US Army tank corps. The French and the British helped the US in this effort. But not a lot was written about this history. Tanks were used for only 7 weeks at the end of the war.

11:20 – George Patton became the commander of the two tank battalions that were to be used in the war.

14:00 – Many of the records of these early tank battalions ended up missing. Larry found them among US Army Field Artillery records.

21:00 – Larry also collected newspaper accounts that were basically the letters home that some tank officers had sent home. He also made some extensive Congressional testimony on the WWI tank corps in WWI readable in a narrative form.

29:30 – Larry talks about what happened to the tank corps after WWI.

31:50 – Larry talks about a scandalous event that occurred during Patton’s time in WWI.

38:48 – The presence of American tanks helped US Army morale and hurt German morale.

39:39 – Larry summarizes how the end of the war went.

53:39 – Larry talks about how the tanks were moved around the theater of war. He also addresses problems with tank maintenance during combat. He gets into how an American officer named Brain was trying to develop requirements for an American-built tank.

58:30 – Larry will be publishing a translated and edited version of a Russian female soldier’s novel about serving in WWI.

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Lawrence Kaplan

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, world war one, WWI, tank corps, armored warfare, George Patton, French, british, Germans

20th century military history book – “The Palgrave Handbook of Artistic and Cultural Responses to War since 1914” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) – Margaret Baguley and Martin Kirby interview – MHIO Episode 35

Martin Kirby and Margaret Baguley are two of three Australian academics who have been editing a new book exploring how war since 1914 has been represented in the arts in Australasia, the US, and in the British Isles. I spoke with Margaret and Martin about the book.

1:45 – Martin and Margaret talk about how they got into studying WWI and military history. Martin talks about how the movie Zulu affected him.

5:16 – Margaret talks about how she grew up in a small town and how important ANZAC day was to her community.

10:28 – Martin walks about the book. It started as a look at Australian art but expanded to include other national experiences. It covers the US, the British Isles, and Australasia. They look at official art, movies, photos, poets, and may other artistic responses to conflict and war.

24:45 – Margaret and Martin talk about what artworks commemorate, attack war, or are neutral about war.

33:45 – Martin and Margaret talk about art aimed at children and how they discuss it in their book. They also touch on the part of the book that look at games and digital technology that deal with military history.

53:13 – Margaret was surprised at finding out details of how official war art was created. She was also disturbed to learn that among their artist peers, war artists were sometimes thought of as having sold out.

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Margaret Baguley and Martin Kirby

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, Zulu War, WWI, WWII, Australia, US, UK, art, combat art

World War I history book – “German Submarine Warfare in World War I” (Rowman & Littlefield, 2017) – Lawrence Sondhaus interview – MHIO Episode 22

Dr. Lawrence Sondhaus is Professor of History at the University of Indianapolis. He has written numerous books about Naval warfare and about WWI with a focus on the Central Powers. I was able to interview him about his most recent book on German submarine warfare in WWI.

1:27 – Dr. Sondhaus talks about how he got into history writing about it. He was a child of the 60s. He had a particular interest in the Central Powers in WWI since he has a Croatian heritage.

3:39 – Dr. Sondhaus was asked to write a book on the Eastern Front in WWI but he suggested a book on German submarine warfare. He tends to study WWI from the perspective of the Central Powers which is uncommon among English writers on WWI.

5:20 – The Central Powers tended to take the lead in WWI with the Allies reacting and so WWI histories should focus on the Central Powers. He also focused on the German politics behind the war.

8:00 – Germans felt the U-boat blockade of Britain was equivalent to the British surface blockade of Germany. The Americans and the UK didn’t accept this. Also, German U-boat warfare in WWI was not as cruel as that of WWII. German U-boats applied cruiser rules.

11:20 – One German U-boat captain captured a number of merchantmen who became POWs for the duration of the war. However, submarines could not generally hold prisoners or tow them to land.

14:10 – Many German U-boat commanders felt they needed to be chivalrous. It was difficult for them to engage in unrestricted warfare because they were unable to be cruel. This was different from WWII.

16:13 – The Lusitania was not the main reason the US entered the war. It was shocking because of the number of people that died but the US took a long time afterwards to enter the war. It took many decades afterwards for the British to admit that the Lusitania was carrying munitions.

20:45 – When measuring cost to gain, the German WWI submarine was the most effective among the three great submarine warfare campaigns.

25:20 – Both sides used gas, submarines, bombed civilians, and other cruel methods, but the Germans are always the first ones to raise the stakes. This makes their image worse after they lose the war.

28:30 – Germans could not believe that their army did some of the cruel things they were accused of but it turned out they had. Germans were unified in support of the war once the Russians mobilized for war. Dr. Sondhaus highlights the feelings of one German politician, Erzberger, who worried that unrestricted submarine warfare would bring the US into the war. German opinion began to drift towards a negotiated peace during the war.

37:00 – Germany came close to winning the war but the Allied convoy system helped stop German success. The US and UK then used the convoy system in WWII.

41:05 – Dr. Sondhaus used British wreck divers maps to help do his research.

48:46 – The Germans suddenly lost their advantage in sinking ships in August 1918. Up until then they were doing well in this regard. But unrestricted warfare alone was not going to win the war for Germany.

49:57 – Dr. Sondhaus came across amazing stories of survival during submarine accidents and mishaps. There were sad stories about U-boat commanders trying to save enemy sailors.

55:02 – A lot of British historians don’t value US involvement in the war as important as other British efforts. This book adds weight to the importance of American involvement in the war.

1:00:25 – German WWI U-boat commanders went on to very interesting and different things after the war.

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Dr. Lawrence Sondhaus

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, Germany, WWI, world war one, submarine, Britain, UK, U-boats, Italy

World War I history book – “California at War” (University Press of Kansas, 2018) – Diane North interview – MHIO Episode 19

Dr. Diane North teaches history at the University of Maryland. She grew up in the Washington, DC area, fascinated by history. She earned her Ph.D. in History from the University of California, Davis and has recently written “California at War” about California’s experience during WWI. I interviewed her about the book.

2:05 – Diane was enthralled by history from an early age and from growing up in Washington, DC. She would listen to debate in the House and Senate after her chores.

3:09 – The WWI centennial was approaching when she began her research so she focused on the war. She wanted to understand what happens to people when the nation goes to war. California had a huge economy and was a trendsetter so she wanted to write on it.

8:01 – She created a new course at the University of Maryland on WWI because of her interest in the war.

9:11 – The book starts on the 1916 parade bombing in San Francisco with 40 injured and ten killed. The first chapter talks about the US men who fought in WWI before the US entered the war. Many Californians served in Siberia from 1918 to 1920.

11:45 – Chapter 2 looks at the women who served overseas during the war.

13:20 – Chapter 3 looks at how the army and navy spend considerable money building facilities in California. Chapter 4 looks at the economy of war. The war accelerated the process of corporate organization and a dramatic rise in industrial employment. She then looks at what people did in the home front to support the war.

14:40 – She also looks at how minorities participated in supporting the war in the home front. Then she touches on how the state and military dealt with the influenza problem.

15:57 – Chapters 7 and 8 deal with the rise of the security state and the role of government. Private organizations were given the power to spy on citizens without government oversight.

18:00 – California also promoted scientific and agricultural development. But these groups also spied on fellow citizens. Colleges, staff and students were also required to sign oaths of loyalty. German language and literature also could not be studied.

20:46 – Efforts were made to keep the press from writing about the IWW and also to get members arrested. Later rights of fre speech, press and assembly were restricted.

22:49 – The navy split the feet after the war and put the pacific fleet in San Diego. This helped in California’s post war boom.

24:01 – One of California’s Senators was a pacifist and he was appalled by US entry into WWI. Berkley enacted an anti-free speech ordinance. California had a real connection with the war effort before the US entered the war because of its trade with Europe.

26:30 – California did have a strong peace movement that quickly got squashed by Federal efforts. The Post office began curtailing free speech and free press by restricting the delivery of certain newspapers.

28:45 – She started her research with the National Archives in DC, Maryland and California.

30:37 – Hollywood was considered vital for the war effort by the Federal government and this boosted the film industry.

33:39 – Diane came across paintings done by an Army officer while in France. Some US forces didn’t return until 1921 or 22 because they were occupying the Rhine.

35:00 – Californians pushed the Federal government to pass many anti-Asian laws and there were many anti-Asian films put out by Hollywood at this time. There were also may pacifist films. But many were also very patriotic. Many of these films were distributed internationally.

37:20 – Diane found interesting documents from Sydney Coe Howard. He was an airplane pilot and he won an Oscar for his screenplay of Gone With the Wind. His letters are amazing and include vivid descriptions of dogfights and the war. She unearthed many journals, letters, photos and drawings from the war.

41:40 – California women do not get the recognition they deserve for their efforts in WWI.

44:00 – Ship and boat building increased considerably in California during this time. The two major universities were the University of California and Stanford University. A committee was formed to examine and organize scientific research at the time to help the California economy.

47:30 – California’s efforts to organize and improve statewide scientific research was held up as an example by the Federal government for other states to follow.

51:42 – Californians were strongly patriotic and believed President Wilson when he said the war would be the war to end all wars.

52:36 – HG Wells wrote a series of lectures before the war that a good war will end all wars and many people including Wilson bought this idea. However the country was very racist and Wilson had re-segregated parts of the Federal government that had been integrated so the soundness of this idea was questionable.

56:00 – The book will be discounted during the month of July.

Links of interest

https://www.californiaatwar.com/

From the Publisher: https://kansaspress.ku.edu/home/new-notable/978-0-7006-2646-5.html

From your local Independent Bookstore: https://www.indiebound.org/indie-bookstore-finder

From Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/California-War-State-People-during/dp/0700626468/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1527174595&sr=1-1&keywords=California+at+War&dpID=51C5WTuV4dL&preST=_SY291_BO1,204,203,200_QL40_&dpSrc=srch

From Target Books: https://www.target.com/p/california-at-war-the-state-and-the-people-during-world-war-i-by-diane-m-t-north-hardcover/-/A-53530392 

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Diane North

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, California, WWI world war one, Wilson, Berkley, Stanford, San Francisco, San Diego, Hollywood, US Navy

Early 20th Century naval history – Learning War – Trent Hone interview

Trent Hone was written frequently on US Naval history. I interviewed him about his upcoming book Learning War: The Evolution of Fighting Doctrine in the US Navy, 1898-1945 to be published by the Naval Institute Press.

1:45 – Mr. Hone discusses some of his earlier naval doctrine writing. He’s written about night combat in the US Navy in early WWII. He also wrote on how naval doctrine changed over WII. He’s collaborated on different navy history projects. He helped with the WWI navy book To Crown the Waves.

4:45 – Mr. Hone discusses his current book. From the 1890s to the 1940s, the Navy became a learning organization.

8:28 – The Spanish American war is where the US Navy realizes it needs a new institutional structure. This leads to the creation of the General Board in the Navy. Also, there’s a conflict between engineering officers versus line officers. Line officers were then required to be engineering officers and the Naval Academy changed its focus to engineering too.

10:59 – After the Spanish-American war, the US becomes a global empire. The new territories are across the oceans. The General Board thinks seriously about what the Navy should look like with these new overseas commitments.

13:40 – The board is made up of navigation, intelligence, the head of the Navy, and the others. Some leaders in the Navy didn’t trust the Board since it put civilian control over the Navy. The board leads the creation of the Chief of Naval Operations.

16:42 – Surface tactics change before WWI. The Atlantic Fleet was established and the Navy learns how to fight as a fleet rather than as squadrons. They also learn how to use torpedoes in combat. New communications are developed for tactical exercises and new ideas created for independent action.

20:30 – The US Navy went into WWI ready for a big fleet action. But Germany instead uses U-boats to win the war. The US Navy then rushed to built ships good for fighting U-boats.

22:45 – In 1916, the Navy starts to realize that there are many different ways wars can be fought. The Navy begins to grapple with how aviation can be used in the fleet. Submarines are also an uncertainty as far as what their role will be in war.

25:42 – The idea that the Navy was focused on battleships for the next war is a pervasive belief. This idea is tied with the Gun Club, which were admirals focused on big gun battles. There was more diversity in thinking about how the next war would be fought.

29:00 – WWII leaders were adept at using all their available technologies. The Navy generally did promote the best rather than those who were connected politically. Performance mattered. The Navy also created good ways to exchange feedback about important issues. There was also a great deal of creativity during tactical exercises.

32:52 – Mr. Hone looked at exercise reports and doctrinal manuals. But they lacked context about how these ideas were created. He looked at various primary and secondary sources in the National Archives and the Navy War College archives.

37:21 – PBYs were used at night during WWII. There was a large pre-WWII effort to get patrol planes and ships to work together at night. The Navy was also working on destroyer night combat before WWI.

42:00 – Mr. Hone was surprised at how far back some Navy innovations went. He would like to do more research on how the large the spheres of influence of some officers were.

44:22 – Mr. Hone focused on one action on November 13, 1942 at Guadalcanal. History has said that Officer Callahan was confused and overwhelmed at Iron Bottom. However, Navy documents suggest that he used his force the way they were expected to be used against a Japanese battleship.

48:06 – The US Navy learned quicker than the Japanese Navy in WWII and this came from the organizational structure.

53:00 – Guadalcanal has many wrecks that provide information on how the Naval campaign was waged.

53:47 – The book will be on USNI.org and Amazon. His personal website is trenthone.com.

55:00 – The Navy planned for a campaign against the Japan in WWII but they didn’t have an idea of how they would end the campaign. The Japanese focus was on one big battle and they pursued that idea throughout. Pearl Harbor, Midway, and Leyte Gulf were Japanese big battle concepts.

Links

https://www.usni.org/store/books/ebook-editions/crown-waves

https://www.usni.org/

https://trenthone.com/

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Trent Hone

Host: Cris Alvarez

 

Early 20th Century naval history book – “Learning War” (Naval Institute Press, 2018) – Trent Hone interview – MHIO Episode 8

Trent Hone was written frequently on US Naval history. I interviewed him about his upcoming book Learning War: The Evolution of Fighting Doctrine in the US Navy, 1898-1945 to be published by the Naval Institute Press.

1:45 – Mr. Hone discusses some of his earlier naval doctrine writing. He’s written about night combat in the US Navy in early WWII. He also wrote on how naval doctrine changed over WII. He’s collaborated on different navy history projects. He helped with the WWI navy book To Crown the Waves.

4:45 – Mr. Hone discusses his current book. From the 1890s to the 1940s, the Navy became a learning organization.

8:28 – The Spanish American war is where the US Navy realizes it needs a new institutional structure. This leads to the creation of the General Board in the Navy. Also, there’s a conflict between engineering officers versus line officers. Line officers were then required to be engineering officers and the Naval Academy changed its focus to engineering too.

10:59 – After the Spanish-American war, the US becomes a global empire. The new territories are across the oceans. The General Board thinks seriously about what the Navy should look like with these new overseas commitments.

13:40 – The board is made up of navigation, intelligence, the head of the Navy, and the others. Some leaders in the Navy didn’t trust the Board since it put civilian control over the Navy. The board leads the creation of the Chief of Naval Operations.

16:42 – Surface tactics change before WWI. The Atlantic Fleet was established and the Navy learns how to fight as a fleet rather than as squadrons. They also learn how to use torpedoes in combat. New communications are developed for tactical exercises and new ideas created for independent action.

20:30 – The US Navy went into WWI ready for a big fleet action. But Germany instead uses U-boats to win the war. The US Navy then rushed to built ships good for fighting U-boats.

22:45 – In 1916, the Navy starts to realize that there are many different ways wars can be fought. The Navy begins to grapple with how aviation can be used in the fleet. Submarines are also an uncertainty as far as what their role will be in war.

25:42 – The idea that the Navy was focused on battleships for the next war is a pervasive belief. This idea is tied with the Gun Club, which were admirals focused on big gun battles. There was more diversity in thinking about how the next war would be fought.

29:00 – WWII leaders were adept at using all their available technologies. The Navy generally did promote the best rather than those who were connected politically. Performance mattered. The Navy also created good ways to exchange feedback about important issues. There was also a great deal of creativity during tactical exercises.

32:52 – Mr. Hone looked at exercise reports and doctrinal manuals. But they lacked context about how these ideas were created. He looked at various primary and secondary sources in the National Archives and the Navy War College archives.

37:21 – PBYs were used at night during WWII. There was a large pre-WWII effort to get patrol planes and ships to work together at night. The Navy was also working on destroyer night combat before WWI.

42:00 – Mr. Hone was surprised at how far back some Navy innovations went. He would like to do more research on how the large the spheres of influence of some officers were.

44:22 – Mr. Hone focused on one action on November 13, 1942 at Guadalcanal. History has said that Officer Callahan was confused and overwhelmed at Iron Bottom. However, Navy documents suggest that he used his force the way they were expected to be used against a Japanese battleship.

48:06 – The US Navy learned quicker than the Japanese Navy in WWII and this came from the organizational structure.

53:00 – Guadalcanal has many wrecks that provide information on how the Naval campaign was waged.

53:47 – The book will be on USNI.org and Amazon. His personal website is trenthone.com.

55:00 – The Navy planned for a campaign against the Japan in WWII but they didn’t have an idea of how they would end the campaign. The Japanese focus was on one big battle and they pursued that idea throughout. Pearl Harbor, Midway, and Leyte Gulf were Japanese big battle concepts.

Links

https://www.usni.org/store/books/ebook-editions/crown-waves

https://www.usni.org/

https://trenthone.com/

 

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Trent Hone

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: world war 2, world war II, wwii, wwi, world war one, world war 1, navy, us navy, sailors, General Board, Naval Academy, naval aviation, torpedoes, submarines, guadalcanal, jutland, spanish-american war, PBY, ironbottom, night fighting, USS Lexington

WWI history book – “Remembering World War I in America” (University of Nebraska Press, 2018) – Kimberly Lamay Licursi interview

I interviewed historian Kimberly Lamay Licursi about her new book “Remembering World War I in America” being released by University of Nebraska Press in March 2018.

1:09 – Kimberly’s interest in history began with her interest in genealogy. She began in the government field. The book came out of a seminar class she was taking and research she did at the archives of New York state. She noticed that not many books had been written about America in WWI.

3:26 – States tried to create histories of the war. Kimberly looked at movies and [such] pulp fiction to determine how Americans remembered the war. There was even a WWI pulp fiction genre.

6:12 – Many Americans were apathetic after the war. People wanted to move forward from it and thought that maybe they shouldn’t have been involved in it. A lot of soldiers wouldn’t even participate in state remembrances for the war. Many were unemployed and poor after the war.

8:12 – Gold Diggers is a 1930s movie that mentions the Bonus Army. She looked at other movies from 1918 to 1941 such as Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. The Big Parade is the first to really look at the American experience in the war. Aviation movies like Wings became popular later on. Sergeant York becomes very popular right before WWII.

13:24 – King Vidor was one director who wanted to make a grand film but didn’t necessarily want to do a war movie. Warner Brothers made a WWI movie only because they were focused later on WWII.

15:29 – The soldiers who returned after the first returning wave didn’t get parades. Many soldiers resented what they had been through. They weren’t commonly thanked for their service.

17:44 – Americans didn’t see much of the war or the dead. Many dead soldiers were interned in Europe.

19:43 – Even Europeans didn’t talk about the Americans very much. Many Americans wrote memories but they weren’t popular among the public.

21:57 – A Farewell to Arms is one of the more important books about WWI for Americans. But it doesn’t really sell well until the 1950s when it came out into paperback. Academics made it popular and made students read it.

26:19 – The American Legion was prominent in trying to remember American soldiers after WWI. It was made up of veterans without much support from civilians.

28:59 – Kimberly most enjoyed reading the pulp fiction about the war. It was very light hearted and fun in many ways.   Many of the writers were veterans.

34:21 – During the war many publishers were making a fortune putting out memoirs but soon after, the market disappeared. Most of the war books were supportive of the war, especially with the speech restrictions.

35:33 – There weren’t Federal efforts to get information out. Carnegie funded some national level private efforts.

36:53 – One female memoir by Ellen Lamotte called the Backwash of War is difficult to read because it presents the horror of war and was banned. Katherine Mayo wrote a popular memoir named That Damned Y. Many women wrote war memoirs who were in the war as ambulance drivers and nurses. Willa Cather and Edith Wharton wrote about the war.

39:48 – Two black women wrote memoirs about the war. A black film production company made a movie about the war and African-Americans.

43:40 – Kimberly would like to next write about remarkable women in the 1920s and 1930s. Women lost to history.

 

Links

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0024069/?ref_=nv_sr_2

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0012190/?ref_=nv_sr_5

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0015624/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0018578/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034167/?ref_=nv_sr_1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Farewell_to_Arms

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Vidor

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellen_LaMotte

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Mayo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willa_Cather

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Wharton

 

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

 

Guests: Kimberly Lamay Licursi

Host: Cris Alvarez

WWI history book – “Remembering World War I in America” (University of Nebraska Press, 2018) – Kimberly Lamay Licursi interview – MHIO Episode 7

I interviewed historian Kimberly Lamay Licursi about her new book “Remembering World War I in America” being released by University of Nebraska Press in March 2018.

1:09 – Kimberly’s interest in history began with her interest in genealogy. She began in the government field. The book came out of a seminar class she was taking and research she did at the archives of New York state. She noticed that not many books had been written about America in WWI.

3:26 – States tried to create histories of the war. Kimberly looked at movies and [such] pulp fiction to determine how Americans remembered the war. There was even a WWI pulp fiction genre.

6:12 – Many Americans were apathetic after the war. People wanted to move forward from it and thought that maybe they shouldn’t have been involved in it. A lot of soldiers wouldn’t even participate in state remembrances for the war. Many were unemployed and poor after the war.

8:12 – Gold Diggers is a 1930s movie that mentions the Bonus Army. She looked at other movies from 1918 to 1941 such as Four Horsemen of the Apocalypse. The Big Parade is the first to really look at the American experience in the war. Aviation movies like Wings became popular later on. Sergeant York becomes very popular right before WWII.

13:24 – King Vidor was one director who wanted to make a grand film but didn’t necessarily want to do a war movie. Warner Brothers made a WWI movie only because they were focused later on WWII.

15:29 – The soldiers who returned after the first returning wave didn’t get parades. Many soldiers resented what they had been through. They weren’t commonly thanked for their service.

17:44 – Americans didn’t see much of the war or the dead. Many dead soldiers were interned in Europe.

19:43 – Even Europeans didn’t talk about the Americans very much. Many Americans wrote memories but they weren’t popular among the public.

21:57 – A Farewell to Arms is one of the more important books about WWI for Americans. But it doesn’t really sell well until the 1950s when it came out into paperback. Academics made it popular and made students read it.

26:19 – The American Legion was prominent in trying to remember American soldiers after WWI. It was made up of veterans without much support from civilians.

28:59 – Kimberly most enjoyed reading the pulp fiction about the war. It was very light hearted and fun in many ways.   Many of the writers were veterans.

34:21 – During the war many publishers were making a fortune putting out memoirs but soon after, the market disappeared. Most of the war books were supportive of the war, especially with the speech restrictions.

35:33 – There weren’t Federal efforts to get information out. Carnegie funded some national level private efforts.

36:53 – One female memoir by Ellen Lamotte called the Backwash of War is difficult to read because it presents the horror of war and was banned. Katherine Mayo wrote a popular memoir named That Damned Y. Many women wrote war memoirs who were in the war as ambulance drivers and nurses. Willa Cather and Edith Wharton wrote about the war.

39:48 – Two black women wrote memoirs about the war. A black film production company made a movie about the war and African-Americans.

43:40 – Kimberly would like to next write about remarkable women in the 1920s and 1930s. Women lost to history.

 

Links

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0024069/?ref_=nv_sr_2

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0012190/?ref_=nv_sr_5

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0015624/?ref_=fn_al_tt_1

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0018578/?ref_=fn_al_tt_2

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0034167/?ref_=nv_sr_1

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Farewell_to_Arms

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/King_Vidor

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ellen_LaMotte

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katherine_Mayo

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Willa_Cather

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edith_Wharton

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Kimberly Lamay Licursi

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: world war 1, WWI, veterans, us army, pulp fiction, memoirs, memorials, remembrance, King Vidor, movies, h9ollywood