Roman Empire civil wars history book – “Emperors and Usurpers in the Later Roman Empire” (Oxford University Press, 2018) – Adrastos Omissi interview – MHIO Episode 43

Dr. Adrastos Omissi is a lecturer in Latin literature and his specialty is the later Roman Empire. We spoke about his latest book on panegyrics associated with the Roman civil wars of the Later Roman Empire.

0:52 – Adrastos talks about how he got into studying the history of the Roman Empire.

2:17 – Adrastos talks about the book and the later Roman Empire and the civil wars.

6:02 – Adrastos talks about how bureaucratic Rome was.

8:11 – Adrastos talks about how Roman civil wars commonly began.

13:57 – Adrastos talks about how would-be usurpers put together their forces.

19:49 – Adrastos discusses ideas on how religion affected the civil wars.

22:17 – Adrastos discusses the economic aspects of the civil wars. He makes an interesting point on Roman strategy and the focus of the Roman military.

26:35 – Adrastos talks about the resources he used for the book.

33:34 – Adrastos talks about British museums that have collections dealing with the Roman civil wars.

37:02 – Adrastos talks about the most alarming thing he learned while doing his research.

41:14 – Adrastos talks about the style pf the panegyrics he studied.

44:00 – Adrastos touches on St. Augustine’s writing.

47:55 – Adrastos talks about whether these panegyrics provide any military information.

57:07 – Adrastos can be found on twitter @adrastosomissi

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Links of interest

https://www.gla.ac.uk/schools/humanities/staff/adrastosomissi/

Guests: Adrastos Omissi

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, ancient rome, roman empire, civil wars, Diocletian, Roman emperors, barbarians, Roman army, St. Augustine

WWII history book – “Hitler’s American Friends” (Thomas Dunne Books, 2018) – Bradley Hart interview – MHIO Episode 42

Bradley Hart is an assistant professor at Cal State, Fresno and his research focus is far right extremism in the United States. We discussed his latest book on American support for Nazis prior to WWII.

0:47 – Bradley talks about how he got into studying and writing WWII history. Eugenics started in Britain and the US especially in California.

2:27 – Bradley talks about his book and the research. His book focuses on various groups that supported the German Nazi party.

5:30 – Bradley talks about the various open and secret ways in which Germany tried to influence US politics.

7:07 – Bradley talks about anti-Nazi Germans in the US. However a lot of US college administrators supported Nazi discussions on campus to communist support.

11:40 – Bradley talks about religious figures that supported the Nazis.

14:24 – Bradley talks about Nazi-ism and occultism especially among the SS.

15:58 – Bradley talks about US military support for the Nazis.

16:55 – Bradley talks about politics affects on US support for the Nazis.

17:50 – Bradley talks about how he did his research and the diaries he came across. British agents spied on Nazis in the US and helped stop them.

24:34 – Bradley mentions which American cities had the most Nazi support.

27:15 – Bradley mentions Hollywood films and Germany. He also talks about how the British viewed the US and support for Nazis.

31:15 – Bradley was surprised at the bipartisan hatred for FDR that he found. He also talks about American and British authors who supported and opposed Nazi thought.

36:06 – Bradley talked about using FOIA to get some documents.

41:45 – Bradley mentions a Hollywood ant-Nazi league that included Hollywood celebrities and movie people. But this league was also backed by the communists.

51:38 – He’s on twitter @drbhart and he has a website at bradleywhart.com.

Links of interest

http://bradleywhart.com/about-me/

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Bradley Hart

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, WWII, World War Two, Hitler, Germany, Nazi, FDR, United States

Apache Wars history book – “The Black Legend: George Bascom, Cochise, and the Start of the Apache Wars” (TwoDot, 2018) – Doug Hocking interview – MHIO Episode 41

Doug Hocking has lived in the American Southwest for much of his life. He’s written lots of western historical fiction and non-fiction. We discussed his latest book on Cochise and the Apache War of 1861.

0:50 – Doug talks about how he got into studying the Apache Wars. He grew up on the Jicarilla Apache reservation. He got into studying the Bascom and Cochise affair and found many discrepancies in the accepted story.

6:32 – Doug talks about how he starts the story in 1856. He then gets into how the Apache War started.

13:57 – Doug talks about the differences between US Army and Native American tactics.

He talks about terrain and weapons. He also talks about rations and food for each side.

19:00 – Doug talks about why he considers Cochise the best Apache leader in history.

22:32 – Doug talks about the relationships between the area tribes. He also talks about how the Apache Indians learned how to raid for spoils.

25:16 – Doug talks about how various groups in the area were armed.

29:08 – Doug talks about Apache clothing and how it was affected by combat. He also talks about clothing worn by US soldiers.

37:01 – Doug talks about the US Army were supplied in the area.

39:28 – Doug talks about who had to serve out in this area.

44:04 – Doug talks about what the forts were like in the area.

47:37 – Doug talks about the newspapers and other resources he used. He also mentions some Mexican records hat are useful to this research.

54:40 – Doug came to dislike Rueben Bernard.

58:07 – He’s on DougHocking.com and his books are there as well as on Amazon.

Links of interest

http://doughocking.com/

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Doug Hocking

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, California, Texas, US Civil War, Bascome, Cochise, Apaches, dragoons, Utes, Embudo mountains, Fort Union, Fort Buchanan, Santa fe, General Buell, West Point, Fort Massachusetts, Fort Defiance, Fort Cummings, Army posts, adobe, jachal, Tucson

US Civil War history book – “Meade The Price of Command” (Kent State University Press, 2018) – John Selby interview – MHIO Episode 40

Dr. John Selby is a professor of history at Roanoke College. His concentrations are American 19th century history, the US Civil War, and he Vietnam War as well as American history in general. We discussed his latest book on General Meade.

0:50 – John talks about how he got into writing about the US Civil War. His first study was on the lives of seven Confederate soldiers. He then co-edited a volume on Confederate papers.

4:16 – John talks about the theme of this book.

8:01 – John talks about the Meade memorial in Washington, D.C.

12:34 – John mentions Meade’s work on lighthouses.

22:33 – John talks about the two people who caused Meade the most problems.

23:04 – John talks about general Sickles and his problems with General Meade.

30:38 – John talks more about why Meade doesn’t get credit for the victory at Gettysburg.

36:57 – John talks about the resources he used for his research. It included Meade’s voluminous number of letters.

45:55 – John talks about two questions he grappled with while doing his research.

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: John Selby

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, US Civil War, George Meade, Robert E. Lee, Army of the Northern Virginia, Army of the Potomac, leadership, Union, Confederate

Vietnam War history book – “Vietnam An Epic Tragedy: 1945-1975” (Harper, 2018) – Sir Max Hastings interview – MHIO Episode 39

Sir Max Hastings reported on the Vietnam War early in his prolific career as a journalist. He’s been a BBC correspondent, editor-in-chief of The Daily Telegraph, and editor of The Evening Standard. He’s written numerous books on military matters and has won numerous awards. We spoke about his most recent book on the Vietnam War.

1:01 – Sir Max explains how he got into writing on the Vietnam War. When he first reported on the war he didn’t think he’d end up writing a book on the war.

4:30 – Sir Max wants to make sure that readers understand the atrocities that the North Vietnam was inflicting on people that were hidden from view during the war.

6:39 – Sir Max discusses the problems with South Vietnam leadership.

9:00 – Sir Max talks about how Ho Chi Minh was able to control the situation in Vietnam. He also talks about the mistakes the French made in Vietnam.

12:43 – Sir Max talks about what he chose to tell in this 30 year story. He talks about he drove around the US to interview people who had been in the war, both veterans and Vietnamese.

15:01 – Sir Max talks about interviewing former Air Force navigator and Vietnam POW Norm McDaniel. He also discusses the touching reminisces of a nurse who was in Vietnam.

18:02 – Sir Max talks about the main themes of the book. He believes in the use of force to protect national interest but cultural and social links are needed between the US and the place they are operating in.

20:33 – Sir Max talked to retired Marine General Walt Boomer who provided Sir Max with important thoughts on Vietnam.

22:44 – Sir Max talks about the problems with sustaining public support for the Vietnam War.

24:42 – Sir Max compares British support for the Falklands Islands War to American support for Vietnam.

27:24 – Sir Max talks about the research he did. He used the Marine Corps and the Army historical archives. He also consulted with a retired CIA officer and Vietnamese linguist who has been translating Vietnamese documents, North and South, on the war for decades. Sir Max talks about Vietnamese information he got on a disastrous Marine battle at Di-do. He also came across a North Vietnam novel which was a thinly veiled history of the war from the North Vietnamese side.

31:38 – Sir Max has included material on what was going on in North Vietnam too. All the North Vietnamese thought about was food since they had so many problems with getting it.

33:10 – Sir Max also interviewed Doug Ramsey who was a Vietnam POW for seven years. Despite the ordeal, Doug had a couple of amusing anecdotes about his time.

35:14 – His favorite part of the research was talking to people.

36:48 – Sir Max talks about an interview he did with a former corpsman who often goes to the Vietnam War memorial in Washington, DC.

40:18 – Sir Max mentions having a good interpreter in Hanoi when he did research there.

42:24 – Sir Max mentions a sobering talk with a Holocaust victim.

45:00 – The Chinese and Soviets wanted out of Vietnam almost as much as the US did.

46:53 – Both North and South Vietnam became police states.

49:22 – Sir Max talks about how the media was handled during the war.

50:27 – Sir Max talks about the time he saw a dead soldier’s guts spilling out and how it affected him.

55:23 – Sir Max talks about the Troubles in Ireland which he covered extensively as a journalist. He mentions how US troops had not been taught street fighting even though they ended up having to do it.

1:02:45 – Sir Max had help from a Russian translator who helped with getting information on Russian air defense units in Vietnam.

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Sir Max Hugh Macdonald Hastings

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, vietnam war, ho chi minh, france, United States, Irleand, the Troubles, POWs

WWII Holocaust history book – “You’ve Got to Tell Them” (Louisiana State Press, 2018) – Charles Potter interview – MHIO Episode 38

Charles Potter studied Medieval literature, worked in radio production and has recorded many audio books. When he retired to France to teach he came across a memoir about Auschwitz which he ended up translating. We spoke about the book.

1:07 – Charles talks about how he got into translating this work. He was born during WWII. Two of his brothers served in the war. He studied Medieval Comparative Literature and then became a radio producer. Then he recorded many audio books.

4:00 – He moved to France during his retirement years and got to know France better. He eventually started teaching a class about how the French present WWII to themselves in movies, tv shows and other media.

6:30 – Charles talks about why the French are so fascinated by WWII.

17:34 – Charles talks about how the French depict the Resistance.

19:18 – Charles talks about French attitudes towards the film “Inglorious Basterds.”

23:01 – Charles talks about how he got into translating this book. His French wife was associated with the woman who wrote this memoir.

30:00 – The woman who wrote the memoir was from the countryside close to Paris.

32:41 – The French didn’t want to talk about their participation in the Holocaust. It wasn’t until the 1970s that things changed.

35:46 – We talk about slang used in the camps during WWII.

38:46 – Charles talks about life in the concentration camp.

42:00 – Charles talks about what she wrote about the camp’s liberation.

49:33 – Charles suggests the movie “Son of Saul” for anyone who wants to see life in these camps.

 

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

 

Guests: Charles Potter

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, world war two, WWII, France, germany, Auschwitz, concentration camp, memoir, slang, commando

Napoleonic Wars history book – “The Invisible Emperor” (Penguin Press, 2018) – Mark Braude interview – MHIO Episode 37

Mark Braude is a historian whose specialty is French history. He’s written a new book on Napoleon Bonaparte’s time on Elba and we discussed the book.

2:30 – Mark talks about his start in French history and how he started writing about Napoleon.

4:06 – Mark talks about the book.

6:45 – Mark talks about ideas on why Napoleon was sent to Elba. We talk about how the smaller characters in the book also become very interesting.

17:45 – We talk about French taverns and their interplay with public opinion.

20:59 – Mark talks about the historical valleys between periods of war.

22:35 – Mark talks about his research materials.

27:00 – Mark talks about a prison he visited on Elba where Napoleon had stayed before it was a prison and how this visit connects to the book.

33:24 – Mark talks about why no one has written on this subject before.

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43:53 – Mark talks about the women in Napoleon’s life.

49:06 – Mark talks about how he developed his skills in writing good narrative non-fiction.

53:18 – Mark talks about his research into the Michelin company.

55:59 – Mark has a website, markbraude.com

Links of interest

MarkBraude.com

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Mark Braude

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, Napoleon, British, French Empire, Elba, Campbell, Navy, Bonaparte

WWI military history book – “Pershing’s Tankers” (The University Press of Kentucky, 2018) – Lawrence Kaplan interview – MHIO Episode 36

Lawrence Kaplan is a military historian who has worked for the US Army and has written numerous books on the subject. Today we spoke about his latest book on the American tank corps during WWI.

1:51 – Larry Kaplan talks about how he got into studying the American tank corps in WWI. He found a number of reports associated with the tank corps that hadn’t been discovered before or had been forgotten. Patton was one of the officers involved with the tank corps.

6:30 – Larry talks about the early development of the US Army tank corps. The French and the British helped the US in this effort. But not a lot was written about this history. Tanks were used for only 7 weeks at the end of the war.

11:20 – George Patton became the commander of the two tank battalions that were to be used in the war.

14:00 – Many of the records of these early tank battalions ended up missing. Larry found them among US Army Field Artillery records.

21:00 – Larry also collected newspaper accounts that were basically the letters home that some tank officers had sent home. He also made some extensive Congressional testimony on the WWI tank corps in WWI readable in a narrative form.

29:30 – Larry talks about what happened to the tank corps after WWI.

31:50 – Larry talks about a scandalous event that occurred during Patton’s time in WWI.

38:48 – The presence of American tanks helped US Army morale and hurt German morale.

39:39 – Larry summarizes how the end of the war went.

53:39 – Larry talks about how the tanks were moved around the theater of war. He also addresses problems with tank maintenance during combat. He gets into how an American officer named Brain was trying to develop requirements for an American-built tank.

58:30 – Larry will be publishing a translated and edited version of a Russian female soldier’s novel about serving in WWI.

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Lawrence Kaplan

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, world war one, WWI, tank corps, armored warfare, George Patton, French, british, Germans

20th century military history book – “The Palgrave Handbook of Artistic and Cultural Responses to War since 1914” (Palgrave Macmillan, 2018) – Margaret Baguley and Martin Kirby interview – MHIO Episode 35

Martin Kirby and Margaret Baguley are two of three Australian academics who have been editing a new book exploring how war since 1914 has been represented in the arts in Australasia, the US, and in the British Isles. I spoke with Margaret and Martin about the book.

1:45 – Martin and Margaret talk about how they got into studying WWI and military history. Martin talks about how the movie Zulu affected him.

5:16 – Margaret talks about how she grew up in a small town and how important ANZAC day was to her community.

10:28 – Martin walks about the book. It started as a look at Australian art but expanded to include other national experiences. It covers the US, the British Isles, and Australasia. They look at official art, movies, photos, poets, and may other artistic responses to conflict and war.

24:45 – Margaret and Martin talk about what artworks commemorate, attack war, or are neutral about war.

33:45 – Martin and Margaret talk about art aimed at children and how they discuss it in their book. They also touch on the part of the book that look at games and digital technology that deal with military history.

53:13 – Margaret was surprised at finding out details of how official war art was created. She was also disturbed to learn that among their artist peers, war artists were sometimes thought of as having sold out.

For more “Military History Inside Out” please follow me on Facebook at warscholar, on twitter at Warscholar, on youtube at warscholar1945 and on Instagram @crisalvarezswarscholar

Guests: Margaret Baguley and Martin Kirby

Host: Cris Alvarez

Tags: military, history, military history, conflict, war, interview, non-fiction book, Zulu War, WWI, WWII, Australia, US, UK, art, combat art